Voting “Yes” to the City of Raleigh Transportation Bond on October 8th will Support Cycling in Your Community!

Source: www.raleighbond.com
Source: www.raleighbond.com

As Raleigh continues to grow, it is vital that we invest in our transportation networks. This is key to increasing the quality of life of every resident, and maintaining a healthy and dynamic city. In order to secure the necessary funding needed to maintain and improve our transportation system, the City Council has added a Capital Improvement Transportation Bond to the ballot on October 8th. If implemented, the bond will fund 18 projects throughout the city.

According to the Friends of the Transportation Bond Committee, there are three important highlights to this bond:

  1. Rather than building new roads, the projects support improvements to existing infrastructure. The 18 projects identified represent every area of Raleigh. This is intentional, and meant to impact and improve everyone’s quality of life and continue to strengthen the geographical balance of the city.
  2. Recognizing that vehicles are not the only way Raleigh residents navigate the city, the investments support a diverse selection of infrastructure improvements. In addition to fixing and expanding our existing roads, the bond will also fund significant investments in sidewalks, bike lanes, transit infrastructure and streetscapes designed to give citizens more transportation options, and a more enjoyable travel experience.
  3. The bond does not actually cost that much. In fact, these investments in our transportation system will cost the average home owner $33. Think about it! That is equivalent to approximately six cups of coffee, two movies, or one dinner out.

As advocates for Raleigh’s cycling community, Oaks & Spokes supports the Transportation Bond because the Transportation Bond includes funding specified for enhancements to non-motorized transportation. The majority of the 18 projects meant to be funded by the bond exhibit a complete streets philosophy. This intention behind this type of design is that it provides safe access and mobility for users of all abilities. Providing space where bikes, pedestrians, mass transit riders, and motorists can all interact with ease. It is important to note that by using this philosophy to design roadways, the public realm is improved, and therefore real estate values are enhanced.

This is an example of a Complete Street in Charlotte, NC. Previously a a four-lane, undivided road, that carried over 20,000 per day, now this street has facilities for a variety of transportation options.
This is an example of a Complete Street in Charlotte, NC. Previously a a four-lane, undivided road, that carried over 20,000 per day, now this street has facilities for a variety of transportation options.

The projects that affect cycling infrastructure include:

  1. Blount Street/Person Street Corridor will be given many improvements, including a road diet/restriping of Blount and Person streets from Atlantic Avenue to Hoke Street. The changes would provide improved access and safety for motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians in these busy business corridors.
    Length: 5.7 miles, Vehicles per day: 8,300, Cost: $700,000.
  2. New Hope Church Road will be widened to a three-lane section from Green Road to Deana Lane. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks and streetlights also would be added.
    Length: 0.4 of a mile, Vehicles per day: 22,000, Cost: $3.65 million.
  3. Old Wake Forest Road North will be widened to a four-lane, median-divided section with bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and streetlights from Litchford Road to Capital Boulevard. This project is funded for design and right-of-way acquisition only at this time.
    Length: 1.15 miles, Vehicles per day: 18,000, Cost: $4.8 million.
  4. Rock Quarry Road will be widened to be a four-lane, median-divided road from Old Birch Road to Sunnybrook Road. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and streetlights will be added. This project is funded for design and right-of-way acquisition only.
    Length: 1.19 miles, Vehicles per day: 15,000, Cost: $2.99 million.
  5. Mitchell Mill Road will be widened to a four-lane divided section from Louisburg Road (US 401) to Forestville Road. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks and streetlights also would be installed.
    Length: 1.46 miles, Vehicles per day: 14,000, Cost: $13 million.
  6. Poole Road will be widened to a four-lane, median-divided section from Maybrook Drive to Barwell Road. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and streetlights will also be added. This project is funded for design only.
    Length: 0.94 of a mile Vehicles per day: 13,000 Cost: $881,000.
  7. Tryon Road will be widened to a four-lane, median-divided section with bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and streetlights from Lake Wheeler Road to Par Drive. This project would initiate design and right-of-way acquisition.
    Length: 1.1 miles, Vehicles per day: 13,000, Cost: $4.47 million.
  8. Sandy Forks Road will be widened to a three-lane section from Six Forks Road to Falls of Neuse Road. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks and streetlights also would be installed.
    Length: 1.29 miles, Vehicles per day: 10,000, Cost: $9 million.
  9. Buck Jones Road will be widened to a three-lane section from Farmgate Road to Xebec Way. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks and streetlights will also be added.
    Length: 1.03 miles, Vehicles per day: 9,500, Cost: $4 million.
  10. Blue Ridge Road will be widened to a three-lane divided section with bicycle lanes, sidewalks, and streetlights from Duraleigh Road to Crabtree Valley Avenue. This project is funded for design only.
    Length: 1.58 miles, Vehicles per day: 8,900, Cost: $1.37 million.
  11. Pleasant Valley Road will be widened to a three-lane section from Duraleigh Road to Glenwood Avenue. Bicycle lanes, sidewalks and streetlights also would be added.
    Length: 0.55 of a mile, Vehicles per day: 3,500, Cost: $3.76 million.

Check out this map and see how the bond will improve your community!

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