Category Archives: Lifestyle

Shaw Seeks Bike Share Station

For the second installment of our Bike Share Interview series, Kristy Jackson and Jacob Clayton sat down with Drs. Keith Powell and Stanley Elliott of Shaw University. Dr. Elliott is the Vice President for Student Affairs at Shaw, while Dr. Powell is the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs. Student Affairs at Shaw is concerned with all aspects of student life that take place beyond the walls of the classroom, from housing to campus events to, of course, transportation. Our conversation with Drs. Powell and Elliott addressed everything from Shaw’s health and environmental initiatives to the historic university’s continuing importance in Raleigh’s rapidly changing downtown.

Interview #2: Drs. Keith Powell and Stanley Elliott, Shaw University

photo of Estey Hall on Shaw University's campus
Photo by D. Strevel, Capital City Camera Club

Powell said the Raleigh Bike Share could be a “great fit” for Shaw University, because they “have students coming from all over.” For students who aren’t from the greater Raleigh area, Powell suggested, the Raleigh Bike Share might be a means for greater exploration of downtown. While we mentioned the Raleigh Bike Share’s impact on student mobility in our interview with Kathryn Zeringue at North Carolina State University, Shaw’s smaller size and downtown location provide a different set of challenges. There is simply no room for more parking near the campus, and Powell says that most students don’t drive. According to officials at Shaw, less than one tenth of the university’s roughly 1,500 students have parking passes (1). For students and staff alike, the Raleigh Bike Share could increase mobility and provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about downtown businesses, events, and even professional opportunities.

The proposal for the Raleigh Bike Share also comes at an opportune time for the historically black university, which is kicking off a new preventative health program called “Know Your Vitals.” Powell pointed out that five of the most deadly health issues for African-Americans, including hypertension and diabetes, could, in many cases, be prevented by lifestyle changes. Their plan includes an increased focus on daily exercise, which the Raleigh Bike share could facilitate. In fact, a 2012 study in the American Journal of Public Health suggests that moderate increases in daily walking and bicycling could significantly reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and diabetes(2). The largest barrier to student use, Powell suggested, was a lack of knowledge of bicycle-friendly routes around Raleigh. By pairing with community partners like Oaks and Spokes for guided rides and utilizing route maps provided at stations, that hurdle could be easily overcome.

Along with a tool for building healthy habits, Powell sees the Raleigh Bike Share as a step forward for the health of the planet. With Shaw University’s commitment to creating a greener, more eco-friendly campus, alternative transportation solutions like the Raleigh Bike Share are a great fit. Other cities, both nationally and internationally, already boast considerable carbon dioxide savings from their bike share programs. A 2008 report from the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, for example, claims that the number of miles traveled by bicycle saved an annual 47,450 tons of carbon dioxide that would have otherwise been emitted by automobiles(3). Those savings don’t even account for environmental savings on parking lot construction and maintenance; a 2010 article in Environmental Research Letters estimated that the environmental impact of all parking spaces adds 10% to the CO2 emissions of the average automobile(4).

As we concluded, our conversation turned to the rapidly changing demographics of south and south-east Raleigh. With rising housing prices causing many long-time residents to move further from downtown, Shaw University’s surroundings are changing. Powell said that Shaw would be excited to have a Bike Share station on campus, because it offered a “good opportunity for cross-cultural exchange.” Many newer Raleigh residents don’t know much about the 150-year-old institution, and Powell sees a Bike Share station as an opportunity to bring people to the campus and raise awareness about Shaw University’s contributions to downtown Raleigh.

 

(1) More precisely, Dr. Powell informed us that there were 380 campus permits, 272 of which belonged to staff. Enrollment at Shaw is generally between 1,400 and 1,700 students each semester; that doesn’t include faculty and staff.

(2) Neil Maizlish et al. “Health cobenefits and transportation-related reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the San Francisco Bay Area.” American Journal of Medicine 103, no.4 (2012). 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300939

(3) Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. “Double Dutch: Bicycling Jumps in Philadelphia.” (2008). http://bicyclecoalition.org/our-campaigns/our-reports/#sthash.sxuSBstq.dpbs

(4) Mikhail Chester, Arpad Horvath, and Samer Madanat. “Parking infrastructure: energy, emissions, and automobile life-cycle environmental accounting.” Environmental Research Letters 5, no. 3 (2010). http://dx.doi.org.prox.lib.ncsu.edu/10.1088/1748-9326/5/3/034001

Jacob Clayton's head and shoulders

 

 

Jacob Clayton is a writer and instructor in the Department of English at North Carolina State University. A long-time member of Raleigh’s bicycle community, he’s happy to help write this interview series as an Oaks and Spokes volunteer.

Kathryn Zeringue Talks Bike Share

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be interviewing some local leaders and transportation specialists to get their thoughts on the Raleigh Bike Share. These interviews aren’t an investigation into feasibility; we already know that Raleigh is a good fit for a bike share! Instead, these conversations give us the chance to get an in-depth look at what the bike share might mean for different parts of our community. For our first interview, Jacob Clayton, an Oaks and Spokes volunteer and lecturer in the English Department at NCSU, interviewed Kathryn Zeringue, NCSU’s Transportation Demand Manager.

INTERVIEW #1: Kathryn Zeringue

Kathryn Zeringue looks at the camera from on top of of her black road bicycle in a parking lot.
Kathryn Zeringue, Transportation Demand Manager at NCSU

Kathryn Zeringue is the Transportation Demand Manager at North Carolina State University(1). As the TDM at NCSU, Zeringue promotes carpooling, vanpooling, walking, carsharing, ridesharing, and, of course, bicycling. Having lived in Raleigh, N.C., Blacksburg, Va. and the cycling hub of Austin, Texas, she knows a bit about transportation cycling. I sat down with Zeringue to talk about what the Raleigh Bike Share might mean for our community last Wednesday morning.

Zeringue currently lives in Durham, and she commutes to Raleigh every day by bus. Her bus drops her off on Hillsborough Street, at which point she walks a little over a mile to her office on Sullivan Drive. The practicality of the bike share is obvious to Zeringue; having a bicycle available on Hillsborough street would provide a “last mile solution,” effectively shortening many university employees’ commutes every morning.

NC State students also stand to benefit from the Raleigh Bike Share program, Zeringue argues. It could “give students a lot more choices” in terms of engaging with businesses and events downtown. Many NC State students don’t bring cars to campus, and the GoRaleigh bus system can be intimidating for students who aren’t familiar with public transit. As an instructor at NC State, I know first-hand how disconnected many first-year students feel from downtown, and, with dining and recreation facilities on campus, it’s easy for students to avoid the larger city entirely. The Raleigh Bike Share could be one step in establishing a corridor between students and Raleigh’s thriving downtown. Restaurants, museums, and arts venues get student business, and students get a chance to plug into Raleigh-based companies as they consider their professional futures.

The university has a long history of cooperating with the City of Raleigh to make the city and the campus friendlier to cyclists. NC State’s transportation planners face some unusual, jurisdiction-based challenges when adding to existing infrastructure, but, according to Zeringue, “most of the success [NC State has] had getting bike lanes in has been with the city of Raleigh.” With five bike share stations planned on NC State’s campus, the potential for future collaboration between the university and the city seems high. At this point, the university, like many of our community partners, seems to be waiting for the city to put forward a plan.

Zeringue also sees opportunities for bike share use during Raleigh’s lengthy festival season. During major festivals like Hopscotch, SparkCon and the Oaks and Spokes festival, commuters might be attracted to transportation alternatives that don’t require consulting transit schedules, fighting for parking spots, or detouring around closed-off streets. Other cities have already seen the mutually beneficial relationship between festivals and bike shares. Austin B-Cycle, for example, set their single-day record with 3,032 checkouts during the 2015 SXSW festival.

I closed out our interview by asking what advice NC State’s Transportation Demand Manager has for the Raleigh’s elected officials as they consider whether or not to support the bike share program. Our leadership should “[build] spaces for people, not for vehicles” and “understand the value in prioritizing transportation projects that promote community,” she said. “A bike share could do that.”

 

Remember, this is the first of a number of O&S Bike Share Interviews. Check back regularly for more discussions with leaders from all corners of our community!

 

(1) The opinions expressed in this interview are not intended to reflect institutional policies or commitments on the part of North Carolina State University.

Taking the #Coffeeneuring Challenge

I think the #coffeeneuring challenge comes at the perfect time.  Running from October 4 – November 17, it spans through North Carolina’s fall colors and into the beginning of colder temperatures where you need a reason to get up and get out on a chilly morning.   Although there are several ways to explain what coffeeneuring is, my favorite way of putting it is this:

Getting a cup of coffee with a bunch of rules.

Curvy mountainous roads?  No problem!  I just had a zillion caffeine points!
Curvy mountainous roads? No problem! I just had a zillion caffeine points just outside of Asheville, NC.

Now who would want to do that, you might ask??  Why can’t you just go get a cup of coffee on the weekend and be done with it?  There are folks all across the country getting cups of coffee, following simple rules, and enjoying both small and large adventures in the process.  You can read all about the rules, but I’ll give you the main idea: take a casual bike ride to get 7 cups of coffee in 7 weeks, one cup per weekend day if you work a regular M-F job, at a variety of places and document your experience.  Other beverages such as tea qualify as well.  Read on to learn more about my adventure and hopefully next year you will join myself and others in the challenge!   Continue reading Taking the #Coffeeneuring Challenge

Oaks & Spokes in action!

We have some really AWESOME events happening this weekend and we want YOU to be there!

Saturday August 9th 2pm-7pm : Activate14 – Alternative Transportation Design Summit 

Saturday August 9th 6pm- 10pm : Cranks Arms One Year Anniversary Celebration

Activate 14 is an initiative by the AIANC to educate the public on the benefits of good design and sustainability through a series of summer events and design competitions. These multi-component events will activate the building and grounds of the AIANC Center for Architecture and Design (CfAD) located at 14 E Peace Street in Raleigh, North Carolina. The events will feature speakers and workshops, vendors, food trucks, a beer tent, live music, children’s activities, and exhibitions. Oaks & Spokes will have a booth set up with a living board of the City of Raleigh detailing various routes members of the community take daily. Tricks of the trade and personal testimonies are welcomed! We will also have details of our upcoming fundraising project and goals for Fall 2014! A little birdie told me it had to do with Bike Repair Stations installed downtown and on the greenway with the help of the CIty of Raleigh… 🙂

Crank Arm Brewery is a great local spot located at 319 W Davie Street! Founded with cycling pride, Crank Arm is a craft brewery with tasting room located in the warehouse district. Our mission is to provide fresh artisan beer while utilizing green transportation methods. Come celebrate with Oaks & Spokes while we support some of the raddest dudes and best craft brew in the heart of downtown. We also will have more information about this amazing (not-so) secret Bike Repair Station initiative and fundraising project!

And always remember… Ride ya bike!

Bike to the Tour de Fat with O&S!

This Saturday the Tour de Fat comes to the Triangle bringing merriment, bewilderment, amusement and also some serious refreshment.  Come on an 8 mile ride with us to the American Tobacco Campus to enjoy the festivities! Why? It’s free to attend but TdF proceeds (beer sales!) benefit local non-profit cycling groups and bicycle-afflicted charities including BikeWalk NC, Triangle Spokes Group and the Durham Bike Co-Op.  Holla!

Continue reading Bike to the Tour de Fat with O&S!