Category Archives: Advocate

Musings from this years NC Bike Summit in Asheville

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On September 16th and 17th, over 100 bicycling advocates, practitioners, elected officials, and government staff from across the state gathered in Asheville for the fifth annual North Carolina Bike Summit, hosted by BikeWalk NC and Asheville on Bikes. The Bike Summit consisted of presentations, group rides, a panel discussion about political partnerships, and a reception at the New Belgium brewery. The presentations were centered around the Bike Summit’s theme, Pedaling Toward Economic Development, and the presenters collectively:

  • made the case that bicycling is good for the economy,
  • emphasized the need for increased and sustainable funding for bicycle infrastructure, and
  • highlighted the role that local advocacy groups, e.g., Oaks & Spokes, can play in making communities more bikeable.

Our very own Evan Brigham, Kristy Jackson, Harry Rybacki, and Trung Vo attended the Bike Summit, and of particular interest to us were the discussions about tactical urbanism, marketing bicycling, and embracing diversity. Oaks & Spokes has big plans to leverage our inspiration from the Bike Summit to keep rolling towards a more bicycle-friendly Raleigh.

Also in attendance were Ally Clonch and Nate Seeskin, both students in UNC’s Department of City and Regional Planning who applied for and were awarded Oaks & Spokes conference scholarships. They had this to say about their experiences:

“The NC Bike Summit was a multi-disciplinary gathering of all people with a passion for bike and pedestrian infrastructure: planners, engineers, and activists. I was thrilled to converse with professionals and enthusiasts from a wide range of communities and learn about the challenges and innovations happening across the state. One of the repeated themes of the summit was the importance of inclusive community engagement in order to gain support for societal and infrastructural developments; for instance, tactical urbanism is a relatively cheap and effective tool that bike/ped professionals can utilize to garner public interest in proposed projects. I was also able to learn more technical information about funding, grant procurement, and navigating the legal framework of infrastructure development from public sector professionals. All in all, the NC Bike Summit provided insight to the dynamic evolution of active transportation around the state and harbored collaboration between all types of people to plan for more bike-friendly communities state-wide!” – Ally Clonch

“I am very thankful that Oaks & Spokes sponsored my attendance at the North Carolina Bike Summit. As a new graduate student at UNC’s Department of City and Regional Planning and as a newcomer to North Carolina, the NC Bike Summit was helpful in me gaining my bearings with both the planning and bicycle communities in this state. At this conference, I networked with a variety of planners, engineers, and advocates and learned about the bicycle policy and advocacy environment here. My favorite parts of the summit included hearing from Mike Lydon from the Street Plans Collaborative about tactical urbanism and participating in a breakout hosted by planners at the Wilmington MPO organization on prioritizing funding for bicycle infrastructure. I find it promising that there is a steady network of people advocating for better bicycle infrastructure here in North Carolina and I look forward to getting more involved!” – Nate Seeskin

Stay tuned to learn more about next year’s Bike Summit, Oaks & Spokes conference scholarships, and ways to get involved in bike advocacy!

Capital Blvd Redesign

Check out this video outlining improvements along Capital Boulevard including new bike/ped improvements at Wade Ave and Peace Street. O&S had a big part in pushing for these accommodations by attending meetings which occurred in 2014.

Red Hat Reacts to Bike Share Proposal

O&S Board Member Harry Rybacki and volunteer Jake Clayton sat down with folks at Red Hat to get their take on the recently-approved Raleigh BikeShare. Red Hat already has a small, private bike share; we mused on the potential relationships between smaller bike shares and the city-wide system. Read on for more from one of the the most recognizable businesses in downtown Raleigh.

Bike Share Interview #3: Red Hat

Red Hat Tower is difficult to miss. Among the most impressive buildings in Raleigh with its modern design and bright red roof, it stands as an apt symbol for one of the leaders in Raleigh’s booming downtown. Oaks and Spokes board member Harry Rybacki, himself a Red Hat employee, took a few minutes to sit down with Christi Turner (Facility Operations Program Manager) and Ben Thedieck (Office Coordinator) to talk about what the Raleigh BikeShare might mean for the tech giant.

Right out of the gate, Turner and Thedieck were excited to share Red Hat’s current alternative transportation initiatives, including their own bike share, Quick Spin. The Quick Spin program helps Red Hat associates  get around town for errands and meetings, much like the larger Raleigh BikeShare might. Turner recalled a recent outing during which “Ben [Thedieck] and I . . . went up to the museum and surprised my youngest son” one afternoon. The Quick Spin program makes sense for downtown commuters, our Red Hatters agreed, because it allows associates to bypass the tedious and time-consuming parking process that accompanies automobile use. Outings like Turner and Thedieck’s help associates get more done during the week, both personally and professionally.

Red Hat’s Quick Spin program incentivizes healthier modes of transportation, helps those who participate integrate with their communities, and takes cars off the road during busy workdays. However, it’s worth noting that most companies don’t operate on the same scale as Red Hat. For smaller companies, a privately-owned bike share may not make sense. In Raleigh’s vibrant start-up community, for example, there are countless talented professionals who stand to benefit from a more comprehensive transportation infrastructure. The Raleigh Bike Share could provide that growing group of professionals with a valuable resource.

While the benefit for smaller companies is obvious, Turner and Thedieck also suggested that the Raleigh Bike Share may have a positive impact on Red Hat’s own alternative transportation initiatives. For starters, the Quick Spin program doesn’t allow Red Hat associates to commute to work via bicycle; it isn’t designed to provide a last mile solution. By contrast, the principle of the last mile rests at the very heart of the Raleigh Bike Share project, which will position bike share stations near bus stops to capitalize on Raleigh’s existing alternative transportation infrastructure.

Along with giving people a range of bicycle options, the Raleigh Bike Share could actually make using Red Hat’s Quick Spin program safer. Turner suggested that “when the city of Raleigh focuses on bike riding in the city, that gets the bikers excited at Red Hat to share the road and give them the same treatment [as cars].” In other words, drivers may acclimate to bicycles. It seems paradoxical, but Turner isn’t the only one who thinks that more bicycles might actually lead to fewer accidents. Eric Lamb, the Transportation Planning Manager for the City of Raleigh, recently suggested that “[t]he more drivers see bikes on the road leads to better awareness and lower accident rates overall” (1). In terms of safety, then, users of smaller bike shares, like NCSU’s WolfWheels or Red Hat’s Quick Spin, actually stand to gain from the widespread adoption of transportation bicycling in Raleigh.

At one point or another, every discussion about bike shares turns to parking. Red Hat’s alternative transportation program, which incentivizes commuters who bike or take the bus, is partially motivated by the increasing demand for parking in downtown Raleigh. In the city’s adopted budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year, more than $17,000,000 is designated for parking (2). However, the true cost of parking may actually be even greater. Sprawling parking, which transportation scholars have called a “subtle subsidy of the automotive industry” has been linked to a range of negative economic and environmental outcomes for cities (3). Red Hat’s Quick Spin program shows an investment in the overall well being of the community. It’s safe to say that Raleigh is proud to have innovative companies like Red Hat call our downtown home. When it comes to alternative transportation, the city could benefit by taking a page from Red Hat’s book.

 

(1)Gala, Christa. “Pedaling in Raleigh.” Raleigh Magazine 2 Feb 2016

(2)“City of Raleigh Adopted Budget 2015-2016” raleighnc.gov

(3)Davis, Amelie Y. et al. “The Environmental and Economic Costs of Sprawling Parking Lots in the United States.” Land Use Policy 27, no. 2 (2010). doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2009.03.002

Raleigh BikeShare Rolls Into Town

Good news, everyone! Last week, the Raleigh City Council approved the proposal for the Raleigh Bike Share with an 8-1 vote. Oaks and Spokes, WakeUP Wake County, and many other individuals and organizations worked tirelessly to raise this project’s visibility, and the City Council’s overwhelming support is evidence of our ability to affect change at the local level. However, the process of realizing the Raleigh BikeShare’s full potential is still in its infancy. Moving forward, here are some of the benefits and challenges we will likely encounter as the Raleigh BikeShare becomes a reality.

 

First, we would like to thank the City Council for supporting this new addition to Raleigh transit system. As we implement the Raleigh BikeShare, Raleigh will join twenty-seven other US cities as a transportation innovator. Having reviewed bike share programs across the country, we are confident that Raleigh’s BikeShare, which will serve citizens from all across our city, will stimulate our local economy and improve the quality of living in our city. By replacing cars or pedestrian travel for short trips and providing a “last mile solution” for those citizens who use other forms of public transit, the BikeShare will have Raleigh moving in a whole new way.

 

We applaud our representatives for understanding that the Raleigh BikeShare is an addition to the city’s infrastructure. As such, the costs associated with the Raleigh BikeShare should be considered relative to the costs of other elements of our city’s infrastructure. The $438,000 operating cost, which we believe will be largely subsidized by our community partners, is nothing to sneeze at. However, the price tag looks a bit more reasonable beside the adopted budget for parking in the 2015-16 fiscal year, which was $17,849,615, or forty times as much. The cost seems less outlandish next to the numbers for stormwater management, which received $17,748,688 in the 2015-16 budget. We’re not here to criticize these programs; rather, we hope that these numbers help concerned citizens put the price of this new piece of infrastructure into context.

 

We agree with the Council’s conviction that the Raleigh BikeShare must be a transportation solution. For our citizens who use the bus system or park in remote decks, it makes that last mile to work shorter. For others, it offers an alternative to the hassle of congestion and parking for short trips. For those without cars, either by choice or by necessity, the Raleigh BikeShare opens doors across the city. Students from Peace and Shaw suddenly have time for lunch downtown. Young professionals and families in the Glenwood and Forest Hills neighborhoods no longer waste time circling Cameron Village parking lots. Stations on South Person and South Blount provide access across Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, opening yet another gateway to work and play in downtown Raleigh.

 

Finally, we reaffirm our commitment to making the Raleigh BikeShare accessible to citizens all across our city by addressing issues of location and cost. According to a 2013 publication in the Institute of Transportation Engineers Journal, bike programs that are most successful in low-income communities place stations in those communities, deploy targeted advertisements in those communities, recruit workers from those communities, and even work with local nonprofits to subsidize membership costs. The Raleigh BikeShare should strive to be equitable infrastructure; a moral bike sharing program cannot ignore those citizens who face some of the most challenging transportation problems. Nationally, bike shares have begun to help us rethink who bicycles are for. A 2011 study in Transportation Research points out that bike share users do not fit the profile of area cyclists. They are younger. They are more likely to be women. They have lower household incomes than private bike owners, and they are more likely to cycle for utility. Whether a bicycle offers relief from an unsustainable car payment or shortens the last mile, we insist that the Raleigh BikeShare can and must serve the needs of those citizens in Raleigh’s low-income communities. We look forward to working with invested members of the City Council and local partners to help increase accessibility by emphasizing the Raleigh BikeShare’s convenience and value.

 
The road to last week’s council decision has been long, but the journey is not over. If we want the Raleigh BikeShare to be successful, impactful, and equitable, we must all continue to contribute. Whether we are members of the Raleigh City Council, volunteers for Oaks and Spokes, or stakeholders with local partners, it is up to us to decide what the Raleigh BikeShare will be.

Shaw Seeks Bike Share Station

For the second installment of our Bike Share Interview series, Kristy Jackson and Jacob Clayton sat down with Drs. Keith Powell and Stanley Elliott of Shaw University. Dr. Elliott is the Vice President for Student Affairs at Shaw, while Dr. Powell is the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs. Student Affairs at Shaw is concerned with all aspects of student life that take place beyond the walls of the classroom, from housing to campus events to, of course, transportation. Our conversation with Drs. Powell and Elliott addressed everything from Shaw’s health and environmental initiatives to the historic university’s continuing importance in Raleigh’s rapidly changing downtown.

Interview #2: Drs. Keith Powell and Stanley Elliott, Shaw University

photo of Estey Hall on Shaw University's campus
Photo by D. Strevel, Capital City Camera Club

Powell said the Raleigh Bike Share could be a “great fit” for Shaw University, because they “have students coming from all over.” For students who aren’t from the greater Raleigh area, Powell suggested, the Raleigh Bike Share might be a means for greater exploration of downtown. While we mentioned the Raleigh Bike Share’s impact on student mobility in our interview with Kathryn Zeringue at North Carolina State University, Shaw’s smaller size and downtown location provide a different set of challenges. There is simply no room for more parking near the campus, and Powell says that most students don’t drive. According to officials at Shaw, less than one tenth of the university’s roughly 1,500 students have parking passes (1). For students and staff alike, the Raleigh Bike Share could increase mobility and provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about downtown businesses, events, and even professional opportunities.

The proposal for the Raleigh Bike Share also comes at an opportune time for the historically black university, which is kicking off a new preventative health program called “Know Your Vitals.” Powell pointed out that five of the most deadly health issues for African-Americans, including hypertension and diabetes, could, in many cases, be prevented by lifestyle changes. Their plan includes an increased focus on daily exercise, which the Raleigh Bike share could facilitate. In fact, a 2012 study in the American Journal of Public Health suggests that moderate increases in daily walking and bicycling could significantly reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and diabetes(2). The largest barrier to student use, Powell suggested, was a lack of knowledge of bicycle-friendly routes around Raleigh. By pairing with community partners like Oaks and Spokes for guided rides and utilizing route maps provided at stations, that hurdle could be easily overcome.

Along with a tool for building healthy habits, Powell sees the Raleigh Bike Share as a step forward for the health of the planet. With Shaw University’s commitment to creating a greener, more eco-friendly campus, alternative transportation solutions like the Raleigh Bike Share are a great fit. Other cities, both nationally and internationally, already boast considerable carbon dioxide savings from their bike share programs. A 2008 report from the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, for example, claims that the number of miles traveled by bicycle saved an annual 47,450 tons of carbon dioxide that would have otherwise been emitted by automobiles(3). Those savings don’t even account for environmental savings on parking lot construction and maintenance; a 2010 article in Environmental Research Letters estimated that the environmental impact of all parking spaces adds 10% to the CO2 emissions of the average automobile(4).

As we concluded, our conversation turned to the rapidly changing demographics of south and south-east Raleigh. With rising housing prices causing many long-time residents to move further from downtown, Shaw University’s surroundings are changing. Powell said that Shaw would be excited to have a Bike Share station on campus, because it offered a “good opportunity for cross-cultural exchange.” Many newer Raleigh residents don’t know much about the 150-year-old institution, and Powell sees a Bike Share station as an opportunity to bring people to the campus and raise awareness about Shaw University’s contributions to downtown Raleigh.

 

(1) More precisely, Dr. Powell informed us that there were 380 campus permits, 272 of which belonged to staff. Enrollment at Shaw is generally between 1,400 and 1,700 students each semester; that doesn’t include faculty and staff.

(2) Neil Maizlish et al. “Health cobenefits and transportation-related reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the San Francisco Bay Area.” American Journal of Medicine 103, no.4 (2012). 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300939

(3) Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. “Double Dutch: Bicycling Jumps in Philadelphia.” (2008). http://bicyclecoalition.org/our-campaigns/our-reports/#sthash.sxuSBstq.dpbs

(4) Mikhail Chester, Arpad Horvath, and Samer Madanat. “Parking infrastructure: energy, emissions, and automobile life-cycle environmental accounting.” Environmental Research Letters 5, no. 3 (2010). http://dx.doi.org.prox.lib.ncsu.edu/10.1088/1748-9326/5/3/034001

Jacob Clayton's head and shoulders

 

 

Jacob Clayton is a writer and instructor in the Department of English at North Carolina State University. A long-time member of Raleigh’s bicycle community, he’s happy to help write this interview series as an Oaks and Spokes volunteer.